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Sent:                               Donnerstag, 15. Februar 2018 17:42

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Subject:                          How to prevent a new war in Congo

 

The Economist

Hand-picked stories from this week's issue of The Economist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editor’s picks

 

Thursday | February 15th 2018

 

 

 

The Economist

 

Twenty years ago, a war in Congo sucked in bordering countries and claimed more lives than any other conflict since the 1940s. Our cover this week warns that, beset by a failed presidency, a predatory state and violent ethnic militias,  Congo is once again stumbling into conflict. It is not too late for the world to do something


Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief

 

 

 

Who is winning the tech race, America or China?

Chinese tech firms were once seen as copycats and industrial spies. Then China was a tech Galapagos, with unique firms that would never spread abroad. Now America fears that China is reaching tech parity. Using ten measures, our Schumpeter columnist gauges which superpower is on top

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Chinese tech firms were once seen as copycats and industrial spies. Then China was a tech Galapagos, with unique firms that would never spread abroad. Now America fears that China is reaching tech parity. Using ten measures, our Schumpeter columnist gauges which superpower is on top

READ MORE

 

 

Bye-bye, Bibi?

Binyamin Netanyahu was poised to become Israel’s longest-serving prime minister. Instead, accused by the police of bribery, fraud and breach of trust, he is fighting for his political survival

READ MORE >

 

 

Women on company boards

Ten years ago Norway introduced the first quotas requiring at least 40% of board directors in listed companies to be women. The idea has been widely copied across Europe. Has it worked?

READ MORE >

 

Ten years ago Norway introduced the first quotas requiring at least 40% of board directors in listed companies to be women. The idea has been widely copied across Europe. Has it worked?

READ MORE >

 

 

Economist Films

The global impact of online dating

The online-dating apps Tinder and Bumble have generated 20bn matches around the world. We examine the effect of the online-dating revolution

WATCH >

 

The online-dating apps Tinder and Bumble have generated 20bn matches around the world. We examine the effect of the online-dating revolution

WATCH >

 

Politics this week

Jacob Zuma resigned as South Africa’s president, the evening before a no-confidence vote was scheduled in parliament. The rand surged. Mr Zuma is beset by corruption allegations. The new president, Cyril Ramaphosa, a former union boss and tycoon, is not

SEE ARTICLE >

MORE FROM POLITICS THIS WEEK >

 Business this week

All eyes were on America’s latest inflation report, following the turmoil in markets that was fed in part by worries that central banks will step up increases to interest rates in response to inflationary pressures. Consumer prices rose by 0.5% in January, or 2.1% on an annual basis, more than had been forecast in surveys of economists, but wage inflation was subdued. Investors remain skittish; the yield on American ten-year government bonds jumped to 2.9%, a four-year high. A few days earlier the Bank of England’s statement that it would have to raise rates “somewhat earlier and by a somewhat greater extent” than it had expected had sparked another sell-of

SEE ARTICLE >

MORE FROM BUSINESS THIS WEEK >

 

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