From:                              The Economist <no-reply@e.economist.com>

Sent:                               Donnerstag, 12. Juli 2018 18:38

To:                                   IHS Library

Subject:                          American democracy's built-in bias

 

We have two covers. In Europe we set out to make sense of the resignation of Boris Johnson, Britain’s foreign secretary, and David Davis, his cabinet colleague in charge of Brexit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Economist this week

 

 

 

Your guide to the current edition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We have two covers. In Europe we set out to make sense of the resignation of Boris Johnson, Britain’s foreign secretary, and David Davis, his cabinet colleague in charge of Brexit. For a few hours, there was excitable talk that Theresa May might be toppled as prime minister. But as the week unfolded, it became clear that Mrs May has in fact emerged stronger. Her new Brexit plan, which so irked Mr Johnson and Mr Davis, marks a decisive shift—an attempt to face up to Brexit’s inevitable compromises. The trouble is that Brussels is likely to ask for more and neither Brexiteers nor Remainers much like the deal that is taking shape
In our other editions we look at American democracy’s built-in bias. For Democrats to have a better than 50% chance of winning a majority in the House of Representatives in November’s mid-term elections, they will need to win the popular vote by around seven percentage points—a landslide. The Senate and the White House have a similar bias. In no other two-party system does the party that receives the most votes routinely find itself out of power. What has gone wrong?

 

 

 

Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editor’s picks

 

 

 

Here are the highlights from the current edition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

France
Jupiter Humbled

As criticism of his presidency mounts, Emmanuel Macron adjusts his tone
Europe

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inflation in Venezuela
You look a million bolívares

Inflation is so high that banknotes are worth more folded up into origami objects than as cash
The Americas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terrorism in Africa
Jihad’s next battleground

The fight against Islamic State is moving to Africa and the jihadists seem to be winning
Middle East and Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Banyan
Death of a charlatan

Shoko Asahara, Japan’s mass-murdering cult leader, was hanged this week. He was the first truly modern terrorist
Asia

 

 

 

 

 

 

WeWork
The capitalist kibbutz

Sceptics abound, but there may be more to the American property startup than meets the eye
Business

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mini-grids and development
Empowering villages

New ways of producing and storing electricity could be a boon to poor people in rural communities
Finance and economics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Automating cookery
The rise of the robochef

Automated cooks are fast and reliable. And they don’t swear at their underlings
Science and technology

 

 

Text Box: See full edition

 

 

 

 

 

Editor’s note:
We have recently refreshed the design of our weekly newsletter. Entitled “The Economist this week”, it now offers a closer look at the story behind the cover and a wider selection of articles to guide you through the latest print edition. Tell us what you think in this 30-second survey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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