Detail

Event

VJE Seminar: Pol Antràs (Harvard U.)

Jun 29, 2017, 13:15 - 14:45, University of Vienna, Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1, 1090 Vienna (VGSE seminar room, 3rd floor)

Pol Antràs (Harvard U.)

The talk will be covering two papers:

The Margins of Global Sorcing: Theory and Evidence from U.S. Firms

We develop a quantifiable multi-country sourcing model in which firms self-select into importing based on their productivity and country-specific variables.  In contrast to canonical export models where firm profits are additively separable across destination markets, global sourcing decisions naturally interact through the firm's cost function.  We show that, under an empirically relevant condition, selection into importing exhibits complementarities across source markets.  We exploit these complementarities to solve the firm's problem and estimate the model. Comparing counterfactual predictions to reduced-form evidence highlights the importance of interdependencies in firms' sourcing decisions across markets, which generate heterogeneous domestic sourcing responses to trade shocks.
(joint work with Teresa C. Fort and Felix Tintelnot)

and

On the Geography of Global Value Chains

This paper develops a multi-stage general-equilibrium model of global value chains (GVCs) and studies the specialization of countries within GVCs in a world with barriers to international trade. With costly trade, the optimal location of production of a given stage in a GVC is not only a function of the marginal cost at which that stage can be produced in a given country, but is also shaped by the proximity of that location to the precedent and the subsequent desired locations of production. We show that, other things equal, it is optimal to locate relatively downstream stages of production in relatively central locations. We also develop and estimate a tractable, quantifiable version of our model that illustrates how changes in trade costs affect the extent to which various countries participate in domestic, regional or global value chains, and traces the real income consequences of these changes.
(joint work with Alonso de Gortari)